PCEC – Park County’s Grassroots Organization

EMIGRANT MINE EXPLORATION

THE PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD HAS BEEN EXTENDED UNTIL AUGUST 20. IF YOU HAVE NOT SUBMITTED A COMMENT PLEASE DO SO. IF YOU ALREADY HAVE, WE THANK YOU.

The application and comments are being reviewed by Peter Werner, Project Lead, Custer Gallatin National Forest Supervisors Office, 10 E Babcock, Bozeman, MT 59715  email at:  FS-comments-northern-gallatin@fs.fed.us

Joint State review is being lead by Craig Jones at the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, P.O. Box 200901, Helena, MT 59620-0901 email at:  deqmepa@mt.gov

For addition information visit our Emigrant Mine Exploration Page

Emigrant Peak is an invaluable resource, not because of gold. Soaring above the Paradise Valley, the peak is integral not only to Park County’s magnificent landscape; it is integral to the health of our natural resources and economy.

When the Park County Environmental Council received a notice from the U. S. Forest Service on June 2, 2015, that a Canadian company planned exploratory drilling in Emigrant Gulch and on Emigrant Peak, we were naturally concerned. But it wasn’t until we took a hard look at the Lucky Minerals website and technical documents that we realized that Lucky Minerals had documented plans for an aggressive, multi-phased exploratory drilling project on public and private land. Ultimately, Lucky Minerals has an interest to mining claims on nearly 2500 acres reaching into three drainages (Emigrant Creek, Six Mile and the West Fork of Mill Creek) in our backyard.

While the company accuses Park County Environmental Council and other groups of hyperbole, Lucky’s plans are clearly set out in publically available documents on its website.  Attempts to disavow those plans in the face of public criticism are disingenuous. According to the company’s own document “The purpose of the program is to produce a multi-million ounce gold, 43-101 complaint resource for the project and its various zones.”

If Lucky Minerals has its way, Park County residents and visitors could lose access to vast amounts of public land in the Absaroka Mountains for hunting and recreation. And the mine’s impact could extend well beyond its footprint. Lucky Minerals plans to extract gold from sulfide-bearing rock. When exposed to air and water, sulfides react to form sulfuric acid in a process known as acid mine drainage. Acid mine drainage is highly toxic to fish and other aquatic life. It is through this process that other hardrock mines in Montana—including the Golden Sunlight, Zortman/Landusky, and Kendall mines—have left a legacy of contamination of ground and surface waters that will last for generations.

We can’t do this without your help. Please consider becoming a member or contributing to PCEC HERE.

Park County Environmental Council is pleased to present a special video presentation
compiled by members of the community. Please take a minute to watch as Park County
residents share their perspectives about the importance of PCEC in the community
and their lives.

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